Titles in the selected subject

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Willis Duke Weatherford: Race, Religion, and Reform in the American South

by Andrew McNeill Canady

At the turn of the twentieth century, few white, southern leaders would speak out in favor of racial equality for fear of being dismissed as too progressive.

My Brother Slaves: Friendship, Masculinity, and Resistance in the Antebellum South

by Sergio A. Lussana

Trapped in a world of brutal physical punishment and unremitting, back-breaking labor, Frederick Douglass mused that it was the friendships he shared with other enslaved men that carried him through his darkest days.

The American South and the Vietnam War: Belligerence, Protest, and Agony in Dixie

by Joseph A. Fry

To fully comprehend the Vietnam War, it is essential to understand the central role that southerners played in the nation’s commitment to the war, in the conflict’s duration, and in the fighting itself.

Cultivating Race: The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750-1860

by Watson W. Jennison

From the eighteenth century to the eve of the Civil War, Georgia’s racial order shifted from the somewhat fluid conception of race prevalent in the colonial era to the harsher understanding of racial difference prevalent in the antebellum era.

The Civil War Guerrilla: Unfolding the Black Flag in History, Memory, and Myth

edited by Joseph M. Beilein Jr. and Matthew C. Hulbert

Most Americans are familiar with major Civil War battles such as Manassas (Bull Run), Shiloh, and Gettysburg, which have been extensively analyzed by generations of historians.