Titles in the selected subject

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King Lear and the Gods

by William R. Elton

Many critics hold that Shakespeare’s King Lear is primarily a drama of meaningful suffering and redemption within a just universe ruled by providential higher powers.

The Love Story in Shakespearean Comedy

by Anthony J. Lewis

In this fascinating study, Anthony J. Lewis argues that it is the hero himself, rejecting a woman he apprehends as a threat, who is love’s own worst enemy.

Loving Arms: British Women Writing the Second World War

by Karen Schneider

Loving Arms examines the war-related writings of five British women whose works explore the connections among gender, war, and story-telling. While not the first study to relate the subjects of gender and war, it is the first within a growing body of criticism to focus specifically on British culture during and after World War II. Evoking the famous "St. Crispin's Day" speech from Henry V and then her own father's account of being moved to tears on V-J Day because he had been too young to fight, Karen Schneider posits that the war story has a far-reaching potency.

Mark of the Beast: Death and Degradation in the Literature of the Great War

by Alfredo Bonadeo

The First World War is a watershed in the intellectual and spiritual history of the modern world.

The Miltonic Moment

by J. Martin Evans

Milton's poems invariably depict the decisive instant in a story, a moment of crisis that takes place just before the action undergoes a dramatic change of course.